FIFA eWorld Cup esports betting

With tens of millions of hopefuls competing for an ever-growing purse, the FIFA eWorld Cup is the ultimate prize in virtual football. Get clued up about the best online bookmakers for FIFA eWorld Cup betting and find out how you can get in on the act and test your skills against the best FIFA players on the planet.

Best bookies for FIFA eWorld Cup odds

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There are dozens of online sportsbooks that run betting on FIFA esports, but not all are up to scratch when it comes to regulation, reputation, or reliability. Stick with the sites listed above to ensure you always get great odds from licensed betting operators who know how to look after their punters.

What is the FIFA eWorld Cup?

In 2004, the Federation Internationale de Football Association teamed up with EA Sports to launch the FIFA Interactive World Cup. A modest venture at first, the tournament now draws millions of competitors and ranks among the biggest virtual sports championships on the planet.

The eWorld Cup is all about the long-running FIFA series from Electronic Arts, which has churned out new titles every year since 1993. PlayStation 4 and Xbox One users can register at FUTChampions.com, compete online and qualify for the FIFA Global Series, where a field of literal millions is whittled down to only 32 for the FIFA eWorld Cup Grand Final.

The title is decided over three days in a live stadium playoff before an audience of thousands. The group stage is played on day one, the second round and the quarterfinals are completed on day two, and the semifinals and the grand final are decided on day three. The title match pits the top PS4 player against the pick of the Xbox users over two legs, one on each console.

How to qualify for the FIFA eWorld Cup

The FIFA Global Series is the obvious path to eWorld Cup glory. Sign up at FUTChampions.com and compete in the Weekend League to become a verified player, after which you can enter online qualifiers, regional tournaments and other Global Series events. The more you play, the more points you earn; and the more points you earn, the higher on the Global Series leaderboard you go.

There are a few different ways to earn FIFA Global Series points. If you are good enough to land a gig in one of the official Global Series partner leagues, you can pave your way to the eWorld Cup while competing for and against some of the top club sides in Europe, Asia and beyond. Affiliated competitions include:

  • American eMLS
  • Danish eSuperliga
  • Dutch eDivisie
  • English ePremier League
  • French eLigue 1
  • German eBundesliga
  • Spanish Liga eSports
  • UEFA eChampions League

Be warned: qualification for the FIFA eWorld Cup might be the most cutthroat business in all of sport, let alone esport. More than 20 million players signed up for the 2018 edition, and that figure is expected to grow in the coming years.

FIFA eWorld Cup prize money

Between 2004 and 2016, the FIFA eWorld Cup prize pool remained fixed at US $26,000. Only the top three players received a cut – $20,000 for the winner, $5,000 for the runner-up and $1,000 for third place.

In 2017, after Xbox was added as a support platform, the total pool was multiplied more than 100 times to $268,000. England’s Spencer ‘Gorilla’ Ealing took out the top prize at Wembley that year, pocketing a cool $200,000, while runner-up Kai ‘Deto’ Wollin bagged a $40,000 payday. The rest of the top 16 won a share of $68,000, ranging from $5k for third and fourth place to $1k for each of the bottom eight.

The 2018 eWorld Cup Grand Final boasted the biggest prize fund to date. Mosaad ‘MSdossary’ Aldossary became $250,000 richer with his victory over Germany’s Stefano Pinna, who landed a $50,000 consolation prize. The other two semi-finalists earned $20,000 each, the losing quarter-finalists made $10,000 each, and the remaining eight in the last 16 pocketed $2,500 apiece for a total kitty of $400,000.

It does not take a genius to work out that FIFA prize money is on a steep upward trend. The jump from $26k in 2016 to $400k in 2018 marks a staggering increase of 1,438 per cent in only two years. With more and more professional clubs and football leagues launching online gaming divisions worldwide, it won’t be long before the eWorld Cup prize pool cracks the magical $1 million mark and starts overtaking some of the more established esports tournaments.

FIFA eWorld Cup Grand Final results

YEAR VENUE WINNER RUNNER-UP PRIZE
2004 Zurich Thiago Carrico de Azevedo (Brazil) Matija Biljeskovic (Serbia/Montenegro) $26,000
2005 London Chris Bullard (England) Gábor Mokos (Hungary) $26,000
2006 Amsterdam Andries Smit (Netherlands) Wolfgang Meier (Austria) $26,000
2008 Berlin Alfonso Ramos (Spain) Michael Ribeiro (United States) $26,000
2009 Barcelona Bruce Grannec (France) Ruben Morales Zerecero (Mexico) $26,000
2010 Barcelona Nenad Stojkovic (Serbia) Ayhan Altundag (Germany) $26,000
2011 Los Angeles Francisco Cruz (Portugal) Javier Munoz (Colombia) $26,000
2012 Dubai Alfonso Ramos (Spain) Bruce Grannec (France) $26,000
2013 Madrid Bruce Grannec (France) Andrei Torres Vivero (Mexico) $26,000
2014 Rio August Rosenmeier (Denmark) David Bytheway (England) $26,000
2015 Munich Abdulaziz Alshehri (Saudi Arabia) Julien Dassonville (France) $26,000
2016 New York Mohamad Al-Bacha (Denmark) Sean Allen (England) $26,000
2017 London Spencer Ealing (England) Kai Wollin (Germany) $268,000
2018 London Mosaad Aldossary (Saudi Arabia) Stefano Pinna (Germany) $400,000

See the latest FIFA esports odds at BetOnline – the top betting site for punters in United States